How to Talk About Plastic Surgery

If someone you know has had plastic surgery, what should you say? Is it possible to mention their new appearance without causing offense? As Reuters correspondent Mary M. Mitchell points out, these are very important questions in today’s workplace, where four separate generations work side-by-side.

There can be many widely different views on plastic surgery in the same office, so navigating the waters can often be tricky. Mitchell offers several tips for cosmetic diplomacy.

1. Never blurt out a comment on someone else’s plastic surgery.  “Chances are this person is undoubtedly feeling sensitive about their appearance anyway, so, if you must ask, keep it to a simple question of concern and avoid any exaggerated reaction.” As a result, the other person will feel better about their results and themselves.

2. Never ask if someone has had plastic surgery, especially since there are other skin therapies that don’t require incisions. Mitchell says that people should say something like: “You look wonderful. Whatever you are doing lately, it agrees with you.” The other person may open up and feel more comfortable talking about their procedure with you.

3. Never criticize or pass judgment. If someone is considering plastic surgery, listen with a sympathetic ear. Don’t try to talk them out of it or agree that they need the surgery. If someone tells you that they’ve had surgery, ask them what they think of the results. No matter what their viewpoint, express your emotional support. This will make the other person feel that you have their back.

4. Never gossip about other people who have undergone surgery. As medical procedures, surgeries like breast augmentation or rhinoplasty should be treated seriously. This will make the other person feel that you can be trusted.

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Posted in: Cosmetic Surgery

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